2DQuick
Compact & Affordable 2D IR Spectrometer
2DQuick makes 2D IR spectroscopy fast, easy and affordable. Using mid-IR pulse shaping technology, 2DQuick is fast and flexible – switching experiments is performed easily through the software.
FAST
Publication-quality spectra in minutes!
With rapid-scan pulse shaping, the 2DQuick can scan time delays on a shot-by-shot basis. This means that a full 2D IR spectrum can be measured in less than a minute. Multiple spectra can then be averaged as needed for the desired signal-to-noise.
  • Improves signal-to-noise
  • Observe real-time changes in proteins or other samples
  • Average only as long as you need to
POWERFUL

The 2DQuick has many powerful features. Phase cycling, rotating frame and the ability to chose between time- and frequency-domain collection (details below) can all improve signal-to-noise over conventional spectrometers.

FLEXIBLE

By shaping both the pump and probe pulses, the 2DQuick provide the ultimate flexibility in how to collect your 2D IR spectrum. Both pump and probe axes can be collected in either the time or frequency domains.

This flexibility allows you to fully adjust the resolution, bandwidth, and acquisition time for each experiment, depending on what is needed.

Collect broad spectra over the entire bandwidth of your pulses or quickly zoom in on a particular feature of interest.

USER-FRIENDLY
Our powerful, yet user-friendly QuickControl software allows you to change experiments with the click of a button. Advanced 3D modeling means that the 2DQuick is compact and easy-to-align.
MANY APPLICATIONS
Molecular Structure & Dynamics Protein Structure & Dynamics
Real-time Kinetics Materials Science
Molecular Interactions Coherent Control
PROVEN TECHNOLOGY
The 2DQuick is based on research developed in the Zanni research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison:

“Simplified and economical 2D IR spectrometer design using a dual acousto-optic modulator,” David R. Skoff, Jennifer E. Laaser, Sudipta S. Mukherjee, Chris T. Middleton, and Martin T. Zanni
Chemical Physics, 422, 8 (2012)